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Health News for 04/17/14

April 17, 2014

Most Medical Devices Approved for Kids Only Tested on Adults: Study

Most medical devices approved for use in children are not tested on pediatric patients before they are marketed, a new Harvard study finds.
Low Birth Weight, Lack of Breast-Feeding Tied to Inflammation Risk in Adulthood

Years later, people who were underweight at birth, and those who were breast-fed only a short time or not at all, could be at increased risk for chronic inflammation and related health problems, a new study suggests.
Off Season May Not Be Long Enough to Recover From Football 'Hits'

New research shows that the brains of some football players who had the usual head hits associated with the sport, but no concussions, still had signs of mild brain injury six months after the season ended.
Quarter of Prostate Cancer Patients May Abandon 'Watchful Waiting' Approach

Doctors often recommend no treatment at all when a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, opting instead to keep a close eye on the slow-growing tumor and acting only when it becomes aggressive.
Creative Pursuits Might Boost Your Job Performance

Creative activities outside of work may help boost your job performance, a new study suggests.
Health Highlights: April 17, 2014

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:
School Bans on Chocolate Milk May Backfire

Banning chocolate milk from schools may sound like a good move for kids' health, but efforts to do so haven't turned out that way, a small study found.
Small Childbirth Change Might Help Prevent Iron Deficiency in Babies: Study

Changing how newborns are held immediately after birth could boost the use of delayed cord clamping and potentially reduce the number of infants with iron deficiency, according to a new study.
Scientists Find New Way to Observe 'Good' Brown Fat

In a possible advance for obesity research, an MRI scan has pinpointed "good" brown fat in a living adult for the first time.
Bacteria May Survive Longer in Contact Lens Solution Than Thought

Bacteria that can cause serious eye infections are able to survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously known, a new study finds.
Mouse Study Reveals New Secrets of Fertilization

Scientists report they have demystified how a sperm and egg couple, with new research in mice indicating that egg cells carry a special receptor that allows sperm to attach to and fertilize eggs.
Health Tip: Avoid Emotional Driving

Your emotions can hinder your ability to drive safely, so you should keep them in check while you're behind the wheel.
Health Tip: Avoid Diaper Rash

Diaper rash can be sore and painful for your little one, but there are things you can do to help keep diaper rash at bay.
Misdiagnoses Common Among U.S. Outpatients: Review

At least 5 percent of American adults -- 12 million people -- are misdiagnosed in outpatient settings every year, and half of these errors could be harmful, a new study indicates.
Leeches Help Save Woman's Ear After Pit Bull Mauling

A savage pit bull attack results in the total dismembering of a teenage girl's ear. And though the ear remains fully intact, complications during the initial reattachment process raise the real risk she could lose her ear forever.
Diabetes Complication Rates Drop Among U.S. Adults

The rates of five serious complications from diabetes -- heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, amputations and death -- have all dropped dramatically since 1990, a new U.S. government study shows.
Placing Donor Windpipe First in Patient's Arm Helps With Transplant

Doctors in Belgium say they've successfully transplanted windpipes in six patients by first placing donor tissue in the patients' arms.
Chimps Prefer Firm 'Mattress'

Like many people, chimpanzees are picky about their beds, a new study finds.
Apathy Might Signal Brain Shrinkage in Old Age: Study

Older adults who show signs of apathy tend to have a smaller brain volume than their peers with more vim and vigor, a new study suggests.
Key Brain 'Networks' May Differ in Autism, Study Suggests

Differences in brain connectivity may help explain the social impairments common in those who have autism spectrum disorders, new research suggests.
Free Drug Samples for Doctors Might Prove Costly for Patients

Dermatologists who receive free drug samples are more likely to give their patients prescriptions for expensive medicines, a new study says.

 

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