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Health News for 09/12/11

September 12, 2011

Virtual Colonoscopy Still Has Its Skeptics

Whether the most technologically advanced way to check for colon cancer will become the standard screening method of the future does not appear to be a slam-dunk.
Health Tip: Protect Against Sports Injuries

Sports are fun and a great way to exercise, but you can get hurt if you don't take precautions.
Health Tip: Stay Social as You Grow Older

As you age, it's important to maintain existing relationships and continue to make new friends.
When a Parent Dies Suddenly, Child's Grief May Persist

Grief experienced by children and teens after the sudden death of a parent fades over time for most, but some have more complicated or prolonged grief that can lead to depression and interfere with normal functioning, a new study finds.
9/11 Left Permanent Scars on the American Psyche

Seven decades and several wars have past, but the bombing of Pearl Harbor still packs a psychological punch for many Americans. Enduring as a kind of national tipping point, it serves as the moment when a stunned young country shed a provincial sense of isolation and strode onto the world stage with the now-iconic can-do bravado of the "Greatest Generation."
For Many Americans, 9/11 Worries Still Dominate

Almost half of all the U.S. adults who experienced physical or psychological problems in the months following the 9/11 terrorist attacks still struggle with feelings of fear and anxiety 10 years later, a new Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll found.
Lifetime 'Dose' of Excess Weight Linked to Diabetes Risk

It's long been known that obesity increases diabetes risk, but a new study finds that the amount of excess weight someone carries -- and how long it's carried -- can make that risk even higher.
Linking Pharmacies With Doctors' Offices Can Improve Med Adherence: Study

Linking doctors' offices with pharmacies via electronic health records improves the number of patients who follow doctor's orders on medications for chronic illnesses, a new study suggests.
Insulin Spray May Improve Alzheimer's Symptoms

A nasal insulin spray may someday help people with mild memory problems or early Alzheimer's disease improve or preserve their mental functioning, a new small study suggests.
Women With BRCA Mutations Get Cancer Diagnosis Earlier Than Before

Women with the genetic BRCA mutations, known to be at higher risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers, are being diagnosed with those cancers earlier than previous generations, researchers now report.
Eye Antibiotics Can Cause Drug-Resistant Bacteria: Study

Repeated use of antibiotics among patients who receive eye injections for such ophthalmic conditions as age-related macular degeneration can lead to the emergence of drug-resistant germs, according to a new study.
Heart Devices Like Pacemakers Linked to Infections

Implantable electronic devices such as pacemakers and certain defibrillators can help treat heart conditions and save lives, but these benefits may have to be weighed against potentially life-threatening and costly complications, a new study suggests.
IUDs May Lower Women's Risk for Cervical Cancer: Study

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) may reduce a woman's risk of cervical cancer, a new study contends.
Testosterone Levels Seem to Fall With Fatherhood

A new study suggests that testosterone levels drop after men become fathers, perhaps because they don't need to compete with other males for mates anymore and instead focus on bonding with their children.
High Cholesterol Might Be Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

New research suggests that high cholesterol levels could boost the risk of Alzheimer's disease by creating more brain-clogging bits known as plaque.
Health Highlights: Sept. 12, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:
Public Often Unaware of a Drug's Safety Record -- Or Lack of One

Many patients mistakenly believe that medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are foolproof and free of harmful side effects, a new study finds.
Is 'SpongeBob' Too Much for Young Minds?

Fast-paced TV shows like "SpongeBob SquarePants" seem to negatively affect children's concentration levels shortly after watching them, while slower-paced shows don't, a new study suggests.
NSAID Painkillers Linked to Risk of Kidney Cancer

The long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Advil, Motrin and Aleve may slightly increase the risk for developing kidney cancer, Harvard researchers report.

 

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