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Health News for 04/19/11

April 19, 2011

Health Tip: Some Foods and Drinks That Trigger Heartburn

If you're prone to the painful burn of heartburn, don't just pop an antacid -- watch what you eat to avoid getting heartburn in the first place.
Health Tip: Kid-Proof Your Bathroom

Kids can easily slip, fall or burn themselves in bathrooms.
Most Parents Vaccinate Kids, Trust Docs' Advice on Shots

About 93 percent of parents said their children either had or were going to get all of the recommended vaccinations, and more than three-fourths said they trusted their doctor's advice on immunizations, two new surveys find.
Birth Even a Few Weeks Early May Raise Odds for ADHD

The risk that children will develop attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rises with every week they are born short of full term, a new study suggests.
Off-Label Use of Clotting Drug Soars, Report Finds

Hospitals are using a pricey blood-clotting drug in treating people who do not have hemophilia, a rare disorder in which blood does not clot normally -- even though its use in such patients is potentially risky, according to new research.
Mental Health Effects Linger After Tsunami, Study Finds

Swedish tourists who saw the most severe trauma in the wake of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami have taken longer than their peers to recover psychologically, a new study has found.
Depression Common After Brain Injury

Nearly one-third of people who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) will experience depression after the injury, a new study finds.
For Nonsmokers, Healthy Living Cuts Death Rate in Half: Study

A healthy lifestyle nearly halves nonsmokers' risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease and other causes, a new study finds.
Minority Kids With Heart Defects More Likely to Die in Childhood

Minority children in the United States born with heart defects are more likely to die in early childhood than whites, a new study finds.
Children With HIV at Higher Risk of Drug Resistance

About 1 in 8 children infected with HIV experiences triple-class virological failure -- meaning the virus becomes resistant to multiple drugs -- within five years of starting antiretroviral treatment, a European study shows.
Alzheimer's Cases Could Double With New Guidelines: Expert

The first new guidelines in 27 years for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease could double the number of Americans defined as having the brain-robbing illness.
Too Many Parents Think Injuries Are 'Part of the Game'

With another season of warm-weather sports under way, experts are cautioning that many parents don't take sports injury prevention seriously enough -- that they consider commonplace sprains, bruises and pulled muscles "just part of the game."
Motorcycle Deaths Drop for Second Straight Year: Report

Motorcycle deaths in the United States fell by about 2 percent between 2009 and 2010, the second year in a row fatalities have declined, according to a new report.
Health Highlights: April 19, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:
Genes May Affect Whether People Heed Advice

Certain gene mutations influence how likely people are to heed advice, even if that advice runs counter to experience, say researchers at Brown University.
Shorter Hospital Stays, More Readmissions After Hip Replacements

People who have hip replacement surgery now spend far shorter recovery time in hospital than they did almost two decades ago, but discharges to nursing facilities and readmissions to hospitals have soared as a result, Iowa researchers report.
Breast Implants, Lymphoma Link Seen

New research suggests a link between breast implants and a rare form of lymphoma, but it's not known if the implants actually cause the cancer or how the disease might develop.
FDA Looks to Crack Down on Misuse of Opioid Painkillers

U.S. health officials unveiled Tuesday a new plan to try to curb misuse of extended-release and long-acting opioid pain killers such as OxyContin, morphine and methadone.
Genome Scans May Reveal Life-Saving Alternatives for Cancer Patients

A 39-year-old woman is referred to Washington University's Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis with suspected acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a cancer that can be treated relatively simply with medication, or not so simply with a high-risk stem cell transplant, depending on the tumor subtype.
Women Taking Calcium Supplements May Risk Heart Health, Researchers Say

More evidence is emerging that women who take calcium supplements to prevent bone deterioration may, in fact, be risking their heart health.

 

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