Crouse: A leader in healthcare, a caring community partner.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Surgical Care Improvement

The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national quality partnership of organizations focused on improving surgical care by significantly reducing surgical complications. It is a unique partnership that’s proving to be a transformational undertaking in healthcare. Crouse Hospital is actively participating in this important project.


Click here for Surgical Services at Crouse.


The charts below demonstrate how Crouse Hospital compares with other providers.


July '10 - June '11

Flash was not detected. Please download the free plugin to view these charts.


Why is this important?
Surgical wound infections can be prevented. Medical research shows that surgery patients who get antibiotics within the hour before their surgery are less likely to get wound infections. Getting an antibiotic earlier, or after surgery begins, is not as effective. Hospital staff should make sure surgery patients get antibiotics at the right time.


July '10 - June '11



Why is this important?
Surgical wound infections can be prevented. Medical research has shown that certain antibiotics work better to prevent wound infections for certain types of surgery. Hospital staff should make sure patients get the antibiotic that works best for their type of surgery.


July '10 - June '11



Why is this important?
Antibiotics are often given to patients before surgery to prevent infection. Taking these antibiotics for more than 24 hours after routine surgery is usually not necessary. Continuing the medication longer than necessary can increase the risk of side effects such as stomach aches and serious types of diarrhea. Also, when antibiotics are used for too long, patients can develop resistance to them and the antibiotics won’t work as well.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Preparing a patient for surgery may include removing body hair from skin in the area where the surgery will be done. Medical research has shown that shaving with a razor can increase the risk of infection. It’s safer to use electric clippers or hair removal cream.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Certain surgeries increase the risk that the patient will develop a blood clot (venous thromboembolism). When patients stay still for a long time after some types of surgery, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs or pelvis. A blood clot slows down the flow of blood, causing swelling, redness and pain. A blood clot can also break off and travel to other parts of the body. If the blood clot gets into the lung, it is a serious problem that can cause death. To help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery, doctors can order treatments to be used just before or after the surgery. These include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings or mechanical air stockings that help with blood flow in the legs.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Many factors influence a surgery patient’s risk of developing a blood clot, including the type of surgery. When patients stay still for a long time after some types of surgery, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs, or pelvis. A blood clot slows down the flow of blood, causing swelling, redness, and pain. A blood clot can also break off and travel to other parts of the body. If the blood clot gets into the lung, it is a serious problem that can sometimes cause death. Treatments to help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings or mechanical air stockings that help with blood flow in the legs. These treatments need to be started at the right time, which is typically during the period that begins 24 hours before surgery and ends 24 hours after surgery.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections. Medical research shows that surgery patients who get antibiotics within the hour before their surgery are less likely to get wound infections. The timing is important: getting an antibiotic earlier, or after surgery begins, is not as effective. Hospital staff should make sure patients get antibiotics at the right time.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections. Medical research has shown that certain antibiotics work better to prevent wound infections for certain types of surgery. Hospital staff should make sure patients get the antibiotic that works best for their type of surgery.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
It is often standard procedure to stop patients' usual medications for awhile before and after their surgery. But if patients who have been taking beta blockers suddenly stop taking them, they can have heart problems such as a fast heart beat. For these patients, staying on beta blockers before and after surgery makes it less likely that they will have heart problems.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Sometimes surgical patients need to have a urinary catheter, or thin tube, inserted into their bladder to help drain the urine. Catheters are usually attached to a bag that collects the urine. Surgery patients can develop infections when urinary catheters are left in place too long after surgery. Infections are dangerous for patients, cause longer hospital stays and increase costs. Research shows that most surgery patients should have their urinary catheters removed within 2 days after surgery to help prevent infection. Higher numbers are better.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections and other complications by keeping the patient’s body temperature near normal during surgery. Medical research has shown that patients whose body temperatures drop during surgery have a greater risk of infection and their wounds may not heal as quickly. Hospital staff should make sure that patients are actively warmed during and immediately after surgery to prevent drops in body temperature.


This measure shows the percent of patients whose body temperature was normal or near normal during the time period 15 minutes before the end of surgery to 30 minutes after anesthesia ended.


Higher numbers are better.


The rates displayed in these graphs are from data reported for discharges July 2010 through June 2011 (unless otherwise noted). For more current information about Crouse Hospital’s progress in this area, contact our Quality Improvement Department.


OF INTEREST:
 

CQ - Crouse Quality

Read about Crouse Hospital's pro-active approach to patient care.
more >