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Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by bacteria, viruses, or chemical irritants. It is a serious infection or inflammation in which the air sacs fill with pus and other liquid.


Crouse Hospital uses evidence-based treatment guidelines to promote consistency of care and positive patient outcomes. On a monthly basis, a special team of doctors, nurses, pharmacists, nutritionists, respiratory care staff, quality improvement staff and emergency response personnel meets to review the care of our pneumonia patients and identify opportunities for improvement.


The charts below demonstrate how Crouse Hospital compares with other providers in the treatment of pneumonia.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
The pneumococcal vaccine may help you prevent, or lower the risk of complications from pneumonia caused by bacteria. It may also help you prevent future infections. Patients with pneumonia should be asked if they have been vaccinated recently for pneumonia and, if not, should be given the vaccine.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Different types of bacteria can cause pneumonia. A blood culture is a test that lets the healthcare provider know which bacteria may have caused your pneumonia, and which antibiotic should be prescribed. It is best to do the blood culture within 24 hours of arrival at the Hospital and before antibiotics are started. It is also important to start antibiotics as soon as possible. A blood culture lets your healthcare provider know how to best treat you and if any precautions are necessary to prevent the spread of your illness.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Smoking damages your lungs and can make it hard to breath. Smoking increases your chances of getting pneumonia or other chronic lung diseases like emphysema and bronchitis. Smoking is also linked to lung cancer, heart disease, and stroke, and can cause premature death. It is important for you to get information to help you quit smoking before you leave the hospital. Quitting may reduce your chance of getting pneumonia again.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Antibiotics are used to treat adults with pneumonia caused by bacteria. Early treatment with antibiotics can cure bacterial pneumonia and reduce the possibility of complications. This information shows the percent of patients who were given their first dose of antibiotics within four hours of arrival at the hospital. Patients who get pneumonia during their hospital stay are not counted in this measure.


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Pneumonia is a lung infection that is usually caused by bacteria or a virus. If pneumonia is caused by bacteria, hospitals will treat the infection with antibiotics. Different bacteria are treated with different antibiotics. To learn about how hospitals use a blood test to choose the most effective treatment for pneumonia patients, refer to the measure named 'Percent of Pneumonia Patients Whose Initial Emergency Room Blood Culture Was Performed Prior To The Administration Of The First Hospital Dose Of Antibiotics.'


July '10 - June '11


Why is this important?
Flu shots reduce the risk of influenza, a serious and sometimes deadly lung infection that can spread quickly in a community or facility. Hospitals should check to make sure that pneumonia patients, particularly those who are age 50 or older, get a flu shot during flu season (usually November through March) to protect them from another lung infection and to help prevent the spread of influenza. Note: a flu shot is effective for just one flu season!


The rates displayed in these graphs are from data reported for discharges July 2010 through June 2011 (unless otherwise noted). For more current information about Crouse Hospital’s progress in this area, contact our Quality Improvement Department.

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CQ - Crouse Quality

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